Equine

We understand that many of you will have a passion for your horse/s and this shared by our experienced equine veterinarians will ensure that your horse receives expert care.

coverWe understand that many of you will have a passion for your horse/s and this shared by our experienced equine veterinarians will ensure that your horse receives expert care.

Equine Services

We have dedicated ‘Equine’ veterinarians with special interest in equine medicine and surgery. This allows us to provide superb care to our equine cliental.
•    Dentistry: Equine veterinarians with special interest in Equine Dentistry: Trained with the latest power float, power light and tungsten carbide hand rasps. We also have a specially designed headstand for the horses comfort during the dental procedure.
‘Equine dental health is more than just rasping off some sharp points’.
•    Endoscopy of the upper airways and guttural pouches, also including Bronchioalveolar Lavage.
•    Reproductive services including mare pregnancy diagnosis and fresh semen insemination
•    Lameness evaluations including ultrasonography and radiography
•    Radiographs: We are equipped with the latest portable CR digital xray equipment
•    Surgery: Fully equipped to perform in-field general anaesthesia for short surgical procedures. These include castrations, umbilical hernia repair, eye surgery, chemotherapy treatment and many other minor surgical procedures.
•    In some provinces we have equine treatment facilities to allow hospitalisation and intensive care of patients.

For more information or to talk to one of our staff please contact your local clinic.


vetlife-equine-services Equine facilities Vetlife Alexandra
Our purpose built equine facility is located at Dunstan Equestrian Centre in Alexandra: The building contains purpose designed and built horse stocks that are adjustable to accommodate all breeds of horses and ponies; a large horse box filled with wood shavings allowing hospitalisation of patients; a large covered yard is also available for housing of day patients.  Many procedures are performed at the equestrian centre which include radiographs, tendon and pregnancy ultrasound, and full lameness examinations. Also at the facility is an arena, a hard and soft trot up area, and a wash down bay.

 

 

 

 

equine-facility-alex

 


Skin Disease

In the last 6 weeks we have seen a high number of equine skin disease cases within our area. The patterns of the skin disease we are seeing are primarily wheals and nodules. Both patterns of skin disease often present due to some kind of hypersensitivity reaction. This means that something, usually within the environment, has caused the horses skin to become irritable. The cause of this irritation could be one of a number of things; insect bites, contact irritation from a new rug/saddle blanket, sweating underneath the rug, environmental pollens, changes in grass growth, or less commonly a reaction to a change in feed. The skin disease seen can be very uncomfortable or irritating for your horse. Avoid riding your horse, especially if these lesions are found under an area where your tack lies.

 

SKIN-DISEASE-2 skin_disease

Things that you can do to help prevent and treat these skin reactions;

If the weather is suitable, then a cool bath can help to sooth the skin, and if fly bites are not suspected as the cause, then leave the horse uncovered for a short period. While bathing the horse use a non-allergenic shampoo and remove any remaining winter coat. Avoid drastic changes in your horse’s feeding regime, and when changing paddocks, ensure that you introduce new grass slowly. Consider the use of a natural fly repellent.
When should I contact my vet?
Contact your vet early to get advice on medication to treat the skin reaction: We can prescribe anti-histamine tablets, topical soothing medication, and other treatments depending on the severity of the disease. Most skin reactions are a one-off occurrence and are easily cured, however occasionally as your horse ages, seasonal allergies can develop.

For more information or to talk to one of our staff please contact your local clinic.


winter-hayChoosing Hay for your Horse

When choosing hay for your horses there are multiple factors to consider. Why do we feed hay? Hay for health, hay selection, the cut of the hay, harvest and storage.
Being able to identify good quality hay is a great skill for all horse owners. Please click here to view Becci’s advice on the right hay choices for your horses.

Feeding for the Winter Months
In order to decide on how much to feed your horse during the winter you must consider the following:
•    The level of work you require from your horse
•    The current body condition of your horse
•    Is your horse growing, lactating, or pregnant?
The most important part of the horse’s diet is fibre. Feed grass, and plenty of hay or baleage (try to avoid silage). If supplementary feed is needed, aim to feed the minimum amount of grain as is required: Substitute as much as possible with hindgut feeds such as sugar beet pulp and forms of chaff. Food for the hind gut also helps to keep your horse warm. Please feel free to contact Becci at the Vetlife Alexandra clinic for nutritional advice pre-winter. Remember also that most pastures in New Zealand produce grass and hay that is deficient in certain vitamins and minerals for horses, so ask your vet about supplements to ensure your horse’s diet is balanced.

For more information or to talk to one of our staff please contact your local clinic.